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Telephone vs Video, which should you choose? 


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    Scott Sutton
    National Lead Pharmacist at Interface Clinical Services

Whether it’s quizzes during the lockdown, speaking with distant family members or seeing patients, video technology allows us to remain connected with one another. However, just because a piece of tech is newer, it doesn’t automatically mean it will be right for your patients.

Where should I start?

To help you decide whether a remote review is appropriate for your patient(s), you’ll want to start by identifying the right patients for remote COPD reviews. If you’d like some additional support with determining whether a remote review is appropriate, you can refer to the General Medical Council guidance to help you make your decision.

Other points to consider...

Once you’ve got your list of patients for remote review, one of the first things you’ll want to consider is their preference. This may be determined at the point of triage when the patient is booked in or at the onset of the review. You may also have your own viewpoints on which is most appropriate based on your knowledge of the patient’s symptoms and the severity of their condition.

Though yours and the patient’s preferences are an important first step, it’s also worth considering that both telephone and video reviews have their pros and cons. To help you decide between the two check out the video below where I evaluated the pros and cons of both, to help you make the most appropriate choice for your patients.

Video from the Best Practice in Remote Consultations webinar

Telephone and video reviews both have their unique benefits and limitations, however one key benefit they share, is allowing you to review the patient without them having to make trips to see you. Video reviews can be particularly useful when assessing inhaler technique as they can allow you to see how the patient is currently using their inhaler.

A required change

Whether we will see widespread use of these review types in the future is not certain, however what is clear is that right now, their use allows provision of care vulnerable members, particularly those who may be shielding and need to be reviewed.

Hopefully this article will help you feel more confident deciding which type of review is most appropriate for your patients. If you’d like to find out more about delivering COPD reviews remotely, check out our what does a remote COPD review involve article.

NP-GB-RS-WCNT-200037 October 2020

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  • Reading time

    7 min read

  • Rating

    5
    0
  • Your expert

    Expert Placeholder
    Scott Sutton
    National Lead Pharmacist at Interface Clinical Services